Library Programs

Adult Programs

Sept. 23 – “Lessons from Lucy: the simple lessons from an old, happy dog, by Dave Barry.”  As Dave Barry turns seventy—not happily—he realizes that his dog, Lucy, is dealing with old age far better than he is. She has more friends, fewer worries, and way more fun. So Dave decides to figure out how Lucy manages to stay so happy, to see if he can make his own life happier by doing the things she does (except for drinking from the toilet). He reconnects with old friends and tries to make new ones—which turns out to be a struggle, because Lucy likes people a lot more than he does. And he gets back in touch with two ridiculous but fun groups from his past: the Lawn Rangers, a group of guys who march in parades pushing lawnmowers and twirling brooms (alcohol is involved), and the Rock Bottom Remainders, the world’s oldest and least-talented all-author band. With each new lesson, Dave riffs hilariously on dogs, people, and life in general, while also pondering Deep Questions, such as when it’s okay to lie. (Answer: when scallops are involved.) (Barnes and Noble)

Facilitator and discussion leader Marsha Bansavage will lead our book discussion.  This program will take place at the Town Hall for proper social distancing from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. and is free, but registration is encouraged.  Books will be available at the library on a first-come, first–served basis.

Oct. 21 – “Furious Hours by Casey Cep & In Cold Blood by Truman Capote.” Reverend Willie Maxwell was a rural preacher accused of murdering five of his family members for insurance money in the 1970s. With the help of a savvy lawyer, he escaped justice for years until a relative shot him dead at the funeral of his last victim. Despite hundreds of witnesses, Maxwell’s murderer was acquitted—thanks to the same attorney who had previously defended the Reverend.

Sitting in the audience during the vigilante’s trial was Harper Lee, who had traveled from New York City to her native Alabama with the idea of writing her own In Cold Blood, the true-crime classic she had helped her friend Truman Capote research seventeen years earlier. Lee spent a year in town reporting, and many more years working on her own version of the case.

Now Casey Cep brings this story to life, from the shocking murders to the courtroom drama to the racial politics of the Deep South. At the same time, she offers a deeply moving portrait of one of the country’s most beloved writers and her struggle with fame, success, and the mystery of artistic creativity. (Barnes and Noble)

Facilitator and discussion leader Marsha Bansavage will compare and contrast the two books and the events that lead to the writing of these two books.  This program will take place at the Town Hall for proper social distancing from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. and is free, but registration is encouraged.  Books will be available at the library on a first-come, first–served basis.

Nov. 23 – ” The Library Book, by Susan Orlean.”  On the morning of April 28, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. The fire was disastrous: it reached two thousand degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a “delightful…reflection on the past, present, and future of libraries in America” (New York magazine) that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

In the “exquisitely written, consistently entertaining” (The New York TimesThe Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries; brings each department of the library to vivid life; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago. (Barnes and Noble)

Facilitator and discussion leader Marsha Bansavage will lead our book discussion.  This program will take place at the Town Hall for proper social distancing from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. and is free, but registration is encouraged.  Books will be available at the library on a first-come, first–served basis.

Children’s Programs

Imagine Your StoryOur summer reading program will be a little different this year but it’s still on!  This summer we want you to relax and read at the same time.  Miss Stephanie has created a Scavenger Hunt that you can fill out at your leisure.  Download the form from our website or call the library for a printed version.  Everyone who participates will receive a prize at the end of summer.  Challenge yourself by checking off all the boxes!  Stay safe and have fun.
summer 2020 scavenger hunt (1)

 

Join Miss Stephanie Mondays and Fridays @ 10:30 for virtual story time live on Facebook!

Continuous…….

Story Time will take place at 10:30 a.m each Monday.  Join us for stories, songs, games and finger play. There is no need to register, just drop in. All Children Welcome!

In Stitches is the Chester Library group of knitters/crocheters/sewers (or what-have-you) who meet every Monday evening. Needlecrafters of all skill levels are encouraged to attend, whether to learn or to solve a problem or just socialize with like-minded crafters, novices and experts alike.  Usually they have WAY too much fun (hence the moniker “In Stitches”!) but they always welcome new members and drop-ins.  Monday evenings from 6-8 p.m.

Knitting Basket – The library has a basket of yarn with an assortment of knitting needles for this passive program.  Whether you’re a beginner wanting to try it out or a novice but just don’t want to splurge that’s OK because we have the materials for you to make something small to take away.

Coloring for Adults – Take a break, turn off your brain and relax a bit by popping into the library and color. We will have fun coloring books (find a page you like and a staff member will copy it for you) and pencils. Sorry kids – adults only.

Games! – There’s a variety of games to play at the library, we even have puzzles you can take to a table to work on, just inquire at the circulation desk.

Chromebooks – The library has chromebooks thanks to a grant from the Community Foundation of Middlesex County and the Friend’s of the Library.  These can be used in house along with our Arduino kits for coding fun!

Meet Molly – The library has an American Girl doll that can be checked out for 1 week.  Molly comes in a travel case with a pair of pajamas and slippers as well as a hairbrush.  Now your special little someone can have the opportunity to play with an American Girl doll without incurring the cost of buying one.  Molly is located in our new American Girl section in the children’s room.

 

Bring your child to the library and let them explore our Early Learning Literacy Station (AWE). Thank you to a grant from the Community Foundation of Middlesex County and the Friend’s of the Library, children from ages 2-8 can enjoy over 4000 fun, engaging and interactive programs such as math, geography, reading, art & music and so much more. Bring your child in and let them explore all there is to offer and have fun while learning.

 

 

TEENS

Our “Teen Spot” is always filled with books on trend.

The library is always receiving new books so stop in and “check” them out!

 

 College and Scholarship information

                            

Kaplan Test Preparation                        Number2.com – Vocabulary building, tutorials, practice questions, create                                                                                                                flashcards in preparation for the ACT or GRE

 

                           

CollegeBoard                                         ACT – All about the ACT test          SAT – Free practice test, no registration needed

 

Scholarships and Financial Aid

                     

FAFSA –                                                     Fastweb Scholarship Search
The free application for                          FastWeb will match your interests to over 600,000 scholarships
Federal Student Aid                                 with loan calculators and comparisons

 

Scholarships.com